Team-based Learning (TBL) is fantastic for nurse education, and here’s why

Check out my new publication written with my great colleague at the University of Portsmouth, Jacqueline Priego-Hernandez, on Team-based Learning in nurse education. Highlights are that of 197 student nurses, most reported higher accountability (93%) and satisfaction (92%) with Team-based Learning, and 76% preferred TBL to traditional lectures. Click on the link below to find out why they preferred it:

Branney J, Priego-Hernandez, J, 2018. A mixed methods evaluation of team-based learning for applied pathophysiology in undergraduate nursing education. Nurse Education Today. 61, 127-133. Available online 16 November 2017: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.014

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Essential knowledge for nurses: Evidence-based non-drug options for pain relief post knee replacement

Chiroresearcher

Drug-Free Interventions to Reduce Pain or Opioid Consumption After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
by Dario Tedesco, MD1,2Davide Gori, MD2Karishma R. Desai, PhD1et al

JAMA Surg. Published online August 16, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2017.2872

It’s important for nurses to keep up to date with evidence-based interventions to help their patients with pain management. Many patients continue to experience high levels of pain post-op, so any new options nurses can incorporate into their pain management strategies have the potential to make an important impact on patient suffering.

In this review the authors sought to answer the following question: Which of the nonpharmacological interventions used for postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty are effective?

If you want to know the ‘answer’, click here!

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Student Nurse? Next placement in a nursing home? Get on the train

Cutting the stigma of nursing home placements
by Abby Farzaneh, 2nd year student nurse (adult), Bournemouth University

Some great advice about how to get the most out of your placement should it be in a nursing home. As  outlined in the article, there are loads of learning opportunities and chances to develop your skills – take the chance.

Well done Abby!

And if I may, I will add two words of advice for this or any other type of placement opportunity: be proactive. If you wait for things to happen, the placement opportunities will pass you by like a train leaving you on the platform, wondering what amazing destination you may have arrived at had you had the courage to board. If you actively seek out chances to learn and develop your skills however, every placement, indeed every encounter in life, can be a rich learning experience. Don’t believe me? Be proactive and you’ll see – get on the train.

 

Basic nursing care, done well, is complex, isn’t it?

Basic nursing care – what’s in a word?

What does ‘basic’ nursing care mean to you? This perhaps springs to mind aspects of care such as washing, mouthcare, and assistance for eating and drinking amongst other aspects of living that we normally perform for ourselves when well. Such Activities of Daily Living might be regarded as ‘basic’ as they are easy to learn and don’t require a great deal of mental effort to perform. For others, however, the word ‘basic’ is belittling to the art and science of nursing, reducing nursing to little more than the performance of a series of simple tasks. ‘Basic’ seems to involve what to do (e.g. clean mouth) and how  (e.g. brush teeth) to do it, but does not readily seem to encompass when, who, where, how; and perhaps the most important question word – why (e.g. to promote personal comfort, to facilitate meaning as being regarded as a fellow worthy human being, to maintain homeostasis and reduce the risk of nosocomial pneumonia). Just because the care is directed at basic needs, does that make the care basic too?

What’s better than basic? Fundamental? Essential? Something else?

Alternative terminology such as ‘fundamental’ or ‘essential’ nursing care have been proposed, yet ‘basic’ sticks (for example). This is a deceptively complex and controversial topic which deserves a much more thorough and referenced exploration than I will provide here. For now, I wish simply to propose an acronym, and I would like to know your views on it: BASIC.

Basic care, done well, is complex, but is BASIC nonetheless

Best Care ought to be the best possible skilfully performed care that the nurse can deliver (within the limits of experience, ability, time and cost), not a mechanically performed task
Authentic Care ought to be delivered authentically, that is, delivered purposefully with positive intentions by someone who genuinely cares and wants to care
Specific Care ought to be specific, in other words, patient/person-centred, not task/nurse-centred
Informed Care ought to be informed, in other words, evidence-based (remembering that evidence-based practice includes not just best research evidence but the expertise of practitioners and patient preferences)
Compassionate Care ought to be delivered compassionately, such that the patient/person feels cared for

What do you think?

Do you think that ‘re-claiming’ the word BASIC to show that, when done well (in such a way as to best achieve effective care i.e. maximise patient outcomes), basic care is in fact highly skilled with a good deal of mental effort required? Or do you think this would simply perpetuate the notion that a great deal of what a nurse does is low skill, low mental effort? Do you think my suggestion is nothing more than re-inventing the wheel? Whatever your view, basic or complex, I’d love to hear it.

Got a deadline? Don’t wait for the motivation fairy

Waiting for the motivation fairy
by Hugh Kearns and Maria Gardiner

When you’ve a task to do such as writing an assignment it’s tempting to say “Mañana Mañana”. However, there are only so many “tomorrows” before the deadline and repeated delaying can contribute to unnecessary stress. Instead of giving in to procrastination, click on the image below to get some tips on how to get your drive back, and get your work done on time!

‘Learn How To Study’ has helped more than a million students- your copy (if ordered 15-18th Nov 2016) is free!

LEARN HOW TO STUDY: Developing the study skills and approaches to learning that will help you succeed in university by Derek Rowntree, Professor of Educational Development, Open University (Retired)

confused-student

I’d like to pass on this message from Professor Rowntree as posted in a blog by Professor Debbie Holley, Centre for Excellence in Learning, Bournemouth University. This is a great opportunity to get what sounds like an excellent book and at no cost if you order next week, Hope you like the book and read on to find out more!

“I am posting here in the understanding that we share a concern with helping students improve their approaches to learning. Back in 1970 my book (Learn How to Study) was one of the first to pursue this aim and proved sufficiently useful to go through several editions until the pressures of work at the Open University meant I had to let it go out of print (and date) for some years.

Now I am retired, however, I have been able to bring it up to date and have recently published the 6th edition as a Kindle book (to make the most of digital portability and keep the price down). It is available both as a single volume and (for students who need only some of its content) with its content divided over five smaller Kindles.

The book enters a world in which there is vastly more advice on studying available than when it first appeared and most universities have developed materials and other support specific to their local needs. Nevertheless, colleagues may feel that an outside perspective (such as my book offers) can sometimes provide useful reinforcement. So I hope you will feel able to add it to the arsenal of resources you already provide or recommend to students.

The book normally costs £6.47 (including the free Kindle app that some students may need in order to read it on their favourite device). But for five days next week, Monday 15 – Friday 18th November, the book (and app) will be FREE to anyone who cares to download a copy from Amazon (at: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00UUD3JGY). Downloaders will be under no obligation and I will get no information about who they are”.